Top 4 Most Common Orthopedic Surgeries

Orthopedic surgery has to do with conditions that involve the muscles and skeletons in the human body, even though orthopedic surgeons may use nonsurgical approaches to solve orthopedic problems as well.

Though every surgeon will see a variety of different patient cases that require different treatments, there are a few orthopedic procedures that tend to be the most common.

Here are the top 4 most common orthopedic surgeries:

Total Joint Replacement

Most of the patients that undergo a total joint replacement surgery are previously diagnosed with severe arthritis and seek pain relief and increased range of motion.

During the procedure, surgeons assess damaged parts of the joint, which can lie within many joints in the body, and replace it with metal and plastic surfaces that are naturally shaped to restore knee movement and normal function.

Total Shoulder Replacement

It may sound painful, but this procedure can greatly help patients feel better over time, diminishing the pain they may be feeling in a joint they use so much like the shoulder.

This procedure involves replacing damaged parts of the bone and cartilage with a metal or plastic implant. Much like any other replacement procedure, it improves the range of motion at the shoulder joint.

Spine Surgery

There are a variety of problems that may lead to spine surgery. One of the main reasons why patients seek professional help is because of the increasing back pain that impairs their day-to-day life.

Once a patient decides to have spine surgery, the results will eventually be experiencing less pain and with less pain come additional benefits like increased activity, better physical fitness and increased productivity.

The most common type of back surgery is the Spinal Fusion. During this procedure, the surgeon joins spinal bones, called vertebrae, together. This eventually restricts motion between the bones of the spine and limits the stretching of the nerves.

ACL Reconstruction

ACL stands for the Anterior Cruciate Ligament, which is the major stabilizing ligament of the knee.

Orthopedic surgeons reconstruct this ligament when it ruptures, which can happen while participating in sports or twisting the knee the wrong way.

During this procedure, the surgeon will remove the torn ligament, using your own tissue or the tissue of an organ donor to make a new ACL. Then he or she will attach the new ligament to the bone with screws or other devices to hold it in place. As your knee heals, the bone tunnels created by the surgeon to bring new tissue through will start filling in, securing the new ligament.